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awk

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awk


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Awk  \Awk\,  adv 
  Perversely;  in  the  wrong  way  --L'Estrange. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Awk  \Awk\  ([add]k),  a.  [OE.  auk,  awk  (properly)  turned  away 
  hence  contrary,  wrong  from  Icel.  ["o]figr,  ["o]fugr, 
  afigr  turning  the  wrong  way  fr  af  off  away  cf  OHG. 
  abuh,  Skr.  ap[=a]c  turned  away  fr  apa  off  away  +  a  root 
  ak  a[u^]k,  to  bend,  from  which  come  also  E.  angle,  anchor.] 
  1.  Odd;  out  of  order  perverse.  [Obs.] 
 
  2.  Wrong  or  not  commonly  used  clumsy;  sinister;  as  the  awk 
  end  of  a  rod  (the  but  end).  [Obs.]  --Golding. 
 
  3.  Clumsy  in  performance  or  manners;  unhandy;  not  dexterous; 
  awkward.  [Obs.  or  Prov.  Eng.] 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  awk  /awk/  1.  n.  [Unix  techspeak]  An  interpreted  language  for 
  massaging  text  data  developed  by  Alfred  Aho,  Peter  Weinberger  and  Brian 
  Kernighan  (the  name  derives  from  their  initials).  It  is  characterized 
  by  C-like  syntax,  a  declaration-free  approach  to  variable  typing  and 
  declarations,  associative  arrays,  and  field-oriented  text  processing. 
  See  also  {Perl}.  2.  n.  Editing  term  for  an  expression  awkward  to 
  manipulate  through  normal  {regexp}  facilities  (for  example,  one  containing 
  a  {newline}).  3.  vt  To  process  data  using  `awk(1)'. 
 
  =  B  =  ===== 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  awk 
 
  1.    (Named  from  the  authors'  initials)  An 
  interpreted  language  included  with  many  versions  of  {Unix}  for 
  massaging  text  data  developed  by  Alfred  Aho,  Peter  Weinberger 
  and  Brian  Kernighan  in  1978.  It  is  characterised  by  {C}-like 
  syntax,  declaration-free  variables,  {associative  array}s,  and 
  field-oriented  text  processing. 
 
  There  is  a  {GNU}  version  called  {gawk}  and  other  varients 
  including  {bawk},  {mawk},  {nawk},  {tawk}.  {Perl}  was  inspired 
  in  part  by  awk  but  is  much  more  powerful. 
 
  {Unix  manual  page}:  awk(1). 
 
  {netlib  WWW 
  (http://plan9.att.com/netlib/research/index.html)}.  {netlib 
  FTP  (ftp://netlib.att.com/netlib/research/)}. 
 
  ["The  AWK  Programming  Language"  A.  Aho,  B.  Kernighan 
  P.  Weinberger  A-W  1988]. 
 
  2.    An  expression  which  is  awkward  to  manipulate 
  through  normal  {regexp}  facilities,  for  example,  one 
  containing  a  {newline}. 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
  (1995-10-06) 
 
 
 
  From  V.E.R.A.  --  Virtual  Entity  of  Relevant  Acronyms  13  March  2001  [vera]: 
 
  AWK 
  al  Aho,  peter  Weinberger  brian  Kernighan  (Unix) 
 
 




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