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hades

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hades


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Hades  \Ha"des\,  n.  [Gr.?  +  ?  to  see  Cf  {Un-},  {Wit}.] 
  The  nether  world  (according  to  classical  mythology,  the  abode 
  of  the  shades,  ruled  over  by  Hades  or  Pluto);  the  invisible 
  world;  the  grave. 
 
  And  death  and  Hades  gave  up  the  dead  which  were  in 
  them  --Rev.  xx  13 
  (Rev.  Ver.  ). 
 
  Neither  was  he  left  in  Hades,  nor  did  his  flesh  see 
  corruption.  --Acts  ii  31 
  (Rev.  Ver.). 
 
  And  in  Hades  he  lifted  up  his  eyes,  being  in  torments. 
  --Luke  xvi.23 
  (Rev.  Ver.). 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  Hades 
  n  1:  (classical  mythology)  the  god  of  the  underworld  in  ancient 
  mythology;  brother  of  Zeus  and  husband  of  Persephone 
  [syn:  {Pluto},  {Hades},  {Aides},  {Aidoneus}] 
  2:  (in  various  religions)  the  world  of  the  dead;  "he  didn't 
  want  to  go  to  hell  when  he  died"  [syn:  {Hel},  {Hell},  {Hades}, 
  {infernal  region},  {netherworld},  {Scheol},  {underworld}] 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Hades 
  that  which  is  out  of  sight,  a  Greek  word  used  to  denote  the 
  state  or  place  of  the  dead.  All  the  dead  alike  go  into  this 
  place  To  be  buried,  to  go  down  to  the  grave,  to  descend  into 
  hades,  are  equivalent  expressions.  In  the  LXX.  this  word  is  the 
  usual  rendering  of  the  Hebrew  sheol,  the  common  receptacle  of 
  the  departed  (Gen.  42:38;  Ps  139:8;  Hos.  13:14;  Isa.  14:9). 
  This  term  is  of  comparatively  rare  occurrence  in  the  Greek  New 
  Testament.  Our  Lord  speaks  of  Capernaum  as  being  "brought  down 
  to  hell"  (hades),  i.e.,  simply  to  the  lowest  debasement,  (Matt. 
  11:23).  It  is  contemplated  as  a  kind  of  kingdom  which  could 
  never  overturn  the  foundation  of  Christ's  kingdom  (16:18),  i.e., 
  Christ's  church  can  never  die. 
 
  In  Luke  16:23  it  is  most  distinctly  associated  with  the  doom 
  and  misery  of  the  lost. 
 
  In  Acts  2:27-31  Peter  quotes  the  LXX.  version  of  Ps  16:8-11, 
  plainly  for  the  purpose  of  proving  our  Lord's  resurrection  from 
  the  dead.  David  was  left  in  the  place  of  the  dead,  and  his  body 
  saw  corruption.  Not  so  with  Christ.  According  to  ancient 
  prophecy  (Ps.  30:3)  he  was  recalled  to  life. 
 
 
  From  THE  DEVIL'S  DICTIONARY  ((C)1911  Released  April  15  1993)  [devils]: 
 
  HADES,  n.  The  lower  world;  the  residence  of  departed  spirits;  the 
  place  where  the  dead  live. 
  Among  the  ancients  the  idea  of  Hades  was  not  synonymous  with  our 
  Hell,  many  of  the  most  respectable  men  of  antiquity  residing  there  in 
  a  very  comfortable  kind  of  way  Indeed,  the  Elysian  Fields  themselves 
  were  a  part  of  Hades,  though  they  have  since  been  removed  to  Paris. 
  When  the  Jacobean  version  of  the  New  Testament  was  in  process  of 
  evolution  the  pious  and  learned  men  engaged  in  the  work  insisted  by  a 
  majority  vote  on  translating  the  Greek  word  Aides"  as  "Hell";  but  a 
  conscientious  minority  member  secretly  possessed  himself  of  the  record 
  and  struck  out  the  objectional  word  wherever  he  could  find  it  At  the 
  next  meeting,  the  Bishop  of  Salisbury,  looking  over  the  work  suddenly 
  sprang  to  his  feet  and  said  with  considerable  excitement:  "Gentlemen, 
  somebody  has  been  razing  'Hell'  here!"  Years  afterward  the  good 
  prelate's  death  was  made  sweet  by  the  reflection  that  he  had  been  the 
  means  (under  Providence)  of  making  an  important,  serviceable  and 
  immortal  addition  to  the  phraseology  of  the  English  tongue. 
 
 




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