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hanging

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hanging


  6  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Indentation  \In`den*ta"tion\,  n. 
  1.  The  act  of  indenting  or  state  of  being  indented. 
 
  2.  A  notch  or  recess,  in  the  margin  or  border  of  anything 
  as  the  indentations  of  a  leaf,  of  the  coast,  etc 
 
  3.  A  recess  or  sharp  depression  in  any  surface. 
 
  4.  (Print.) 
  a  The  act  of  beginning  a  line  or  series  of  lines  at  a 
  little  distance  within  the  flush  line  of  the  column  or 
  page,  as  in  the  common  way  of  beginning  the  first  line 
  of  a  paragraph. 
  b  The  measure  of  the  distance;  as  an  indentation  of  one 
  em  or  of  two  ems. 
 
  {Hanging},  or  {Reverse},  {indentation},  indentation  of  all 
  the  lines  of  a  paragraph  except  the  first  which  is  a  full 
  line 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Hang  \Hang\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Hanged}  (h?ngd)  or  {Hung};  p. 
  pr  &  vb  n.  {Hanging}. 
 
  Usage:  The  use  of  hanged  is  preferable  to  that  of  hung,  when 
  reference  is  had  to  death  or  execution  by  suspension, 
  and  it  is  also  more  common.]  [OE.  hangen,  hangien,  v. 
  t.  &  i.,  AS  hangian,  v.  i.,  fr  h?n,  v.  t.  (imp. 
  heng,  p.  p.  hongen);  akin  to  OS  hang?n,  v.  i.  D. 
  hangen,  v.  t.  &  i.,  G.  hangen,  v.  i,  h["a]ngen,  v.  t, 
  Isel  hanga,  v.  i.,  Goth.  h[=a]han,  v.  t.  (imp. 
  ha['i]hah),  h[=a]han,  v.  i.  (imp.  hahaida),  and  perh. 
  to  L.  cunctari  to  delay.  [root]37.  ] 
  1.  To  suspend;  to  fasten  to  some  elevated  point  without 
  support  from  below;  --  often  used  with  up  or  out  as  to 
  hang  a  coat  on  a  hook;  to  hang  up  a  sign;  to  hang  out  a 
  banner. 
 
  2.  To  fasten  in  a  manner  which  will  allow  of  free  motion  upon 
  the  point  or  points  of  suspension;  --  said  of  a  pendulum, 
  a  swing,  a  door,  gate,  etc 
 
  3.  To  fit  properly,  as  at  a  proper  angle  (a  part  of  an 
  implement  that  is  swung  in  using),  as  a  scythe  to  its 
  snath,  or  an  ax  to  its  helve.  [U.  S.] 
 
  4.  To  put  to  death  by  suspending  by  the  neck;  --  a  form  of 
  capital  punishment;  as  to  hang  a  murderer. 
 
  5.  To  cover,  decorate,  or  furnish  by  hanging  pictures 
  trophies,  drapery,  and  the  like  or  by  covering  with  paper 
  hangings;  --  said  of  a  wall,  a  room  etc 
 
  Hung  be  the  heavens  with  black.  --Shak. 
 
  And  hung  thy  holy  roofs  with  savage  spoils. 
  --Dryden. 
 
  6.  To  paste,  as  paper  hangings,  on  the  walls  of  a  room 
 
  7.  To  hold  or  bear  in  a  suspended  or  inclined  manner  or 
  position  instead  of  erect;  to  droop;  as  he  hung  his  head 
  in  shame. 
 
  Cowslips  wan  that  hang  the  pensive  head.  --Milton. 
 
  {To  hang  down},  to  let  fall  below  the  proper  position;  to 
  bend  down  to  decline  as  to  hang  down  the  head,  or 
  elliptically,  to  hang  the  head. 
 
  {To  hang  fire}  (Mil.),  to  be  slow  in  communicating  fire 
  through  the  vent  to  the  charge;  as  the  gun  hangs  fire; 
  hence  to  hesitate,  to  hold  back  as  if  in  suspense. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Hanging  \Hang"ing\,  n. 
  1.  The  act  of  suspending  anything  the  state  of  being 
  suspended. 
 
  2.  Death  by  suspension;  execution  by  a  halter. 
 
  3.  That  which  is  hung  as  lining  or  drapery  for  the  walls  of  a 
  room  as  tapestry,  paper,  etc.,  or  to  cover  or  drape  a 
  door  or  window;  --  used  chiefly  in  the  plural. 
 
  Nor  purple  hangings  clothe  the  palace  walls. 
  --Dryden. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Hanging  \Hang"ing\,  a. 
  1.  Requiring,  deserving,  or  foreboding  death  by  the  halter. 
  ``What  a  hanging  face!''  --Dryden. 
 
  2.  Suspended  from  above;  pendent;  as  hanging  shelves. 
 
  3.  Adapted  for  sustaining  a  hanging  object;  as  the  hanging 
  post  of  a  gate,  the  post  which  holds  the  hinges. 
 
  {Hanging  compass},  a  compass  suspended  so  that  the  card  may 
  be  read  from  beneath. 
 
  {Hanging  garden},  a  garden  sustained  at  an  artificial 
  elevation  by  any  means  as  by  the  terraces  at  Babylon. 
 
  {Hanging  indentation}.  See  under  {Indentation}. 
 
  {Hanging  rail}  (Arch.),  that  rail  of  a  door  or  casement  to 
  which  hinges  are  attached. 
 
  {Hanging  side}  (Mining),  the  overhanging  side  of  an  inclined 
  or  hading  vein. 
 
  {Hanging  sleeves}. 
  a  Strips  of  the  same  stuff  as  the  gown,  hanging  down  the 
  back  from  the  shoulders. 
  b  Loose,  flowing  sleeves. 
 
  {Hanging  stile}.  (Arch.) 
  a  That  stile  of  a  door  to  which  hinges  are  secured. 
  b  That  upright  of  a  window  frame  to  which  casements  are 
  hinged,  or  in  which  the  pulleys  for  sash  windows  are 
  fastened. 
 
  {Hanging  wall}  (Mining),  the  upper  wall  of  inclined  vein,  or 
  that  which  hangs  over  the  miner's  head  when  working  in  the 
  vein. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  hanging 
  adj  :  supported  from  above;  "the  child  dabbled  his  dangling  feet 
  in  the  water";  "fuchsias  in  hanging  pots";  "pendent 
  bunches  of  grapes";  "a  suspended  fireplace"  [syn:  {dangling(a)}, 
  {pendent},  {pendant},  {suspended}] 
  n  1:  something  that  is  hung  (as  a  tapestry)  on  a  wall  or  over  a 
  window;  "the  cold  castle  walls  were  covered  with 
  hangings"  [syn:  {wall  hanging}] 
  2:  a  form  of  capital  punishment;  victim  is  suspended  by  the 
  neck  from  a  gallows  or  gibbet  until  dead;  "in  those  days 
  the  hanging  of  criminals  was  a  public  entertainment" 
  3:  the  act  of  suspending  something  (hanging  it  from  above  so  it 
  moves  freely);  "there  was  a  small  ceremony  for  the  hanging 
  of  the  portrait"  [syn:  {suspension},  {dangling}] 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Hanging 
  (as  a  punishment),  a  mark  of  infamy  inflicted  on  the  dead  bodies 
  of  criminals  (Deut.  21:23)  rather  than  our  modern  mode  of 
  punishment.  Criminals  were  first  strangled  and  then  hanged  (Nu. 
  25:4;  Deut.  21:22).  (See  2  Sam.  21:6  for  the  practice  of  the 
  Gibeonites.) 
 
  Hanging  (as  a  curtain).  (1.)  Heb.  masak,  a  before  the 
  entrance  to  the  court  of  the  tabernacle  (Ex.  35:17);  b  before 
  the  door  of  the  tabernacle  (26:36,  37);  c  before  the  entrance 
  to  the  most  holy  place  called  "the  veil  of  the  covering" 
  (35:12;  39:34),  as  the  word  properly  means 
 
  (2.)  Heb.  kelaim,  tapestry  covering  the  walls  of  the 
  tabernacle  (Ex.  27:9;  35:17;  Num.  3:26)  to  the  half  of  the 
  height  of  the  wall  (Ex.  27:18;  comp.  26:16).  These  hangings  were 
  fastened  to  pillars. 
 
  (3.)  Heb.  bottim  (2  Kings  23:7),  "hangings  for  the  grove" 
  (R.V.,  "for  the  Asherah");  marg.,  instead  of  "hangings,"  has 
  tents"  or  "houses."  Such  curtained  structures  for  idolatrous 
  worship  are  also  alluded  to  in  Ezek.  16:16. 
 




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