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hitch

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hitch


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Hitch  \Hitch\  (h[i^]ch),  v.  t.  [Cf.  Scot.  hitch  a  motion  by  a 
  jerk,  and  hatch,  hotch,  to  move  by  jerks,  also  Prov.  G. 
  hiksen  G.  hinken  to  limp,  hobble;  or  E.  hiccough;  or 
  possibly  akin  to  E.  hook.] 
  1.  To  become  entangled  or  caught;  to  be  linked  or  yoked;  to 
  unite;  to  cling. 
 
  Atoms  .  .  .  which  at  length  hitched  together. 
  --South. 
 
  2.  To  move  interruptedly  or  with  halts,  jerks,  or  steps;  -- 
  said  of  something  obstructed  or  impeded. 
 
  Slides  into  verse,  and  hitches  in  a  rhyme.  --Pope. 
 
  To  ease  themselves  .  .  .  by  hitching  into  another 
  place  --Fuller. 
 
  3.  To  hit  the  legs  together  in  going,  as  horses;  to 
  interfere.  [Eng.]  --Halliwell. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Hitch  \Hitch\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Hitched};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Hitching}.] 
  1.  To  hook;  to  catch  or  fasten  as  by  a  hook  or  a  knot;  to 
  make  fast  unite,  or  yoke;  as  to  hitch  a  horse,  or  a 
  halter. 
 
  2.  To  move  with  hitches;  as  he  hitched  his  chair  nearer. 
 
  {To  hitch  up}. 
  a  To  fasten  up 
  b  To  pull  or  raise  with  a  jerk;  as  a  sailor  hitches  up 
  his  trousers. 
  c  To  attach,  as  a  horse,  to  a  vehicle;  as  hitch  up  the 
  gray  mare.  [Colloq.] 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Hitch  \Hitch\,  n. 
  1.  A  catch;  anything  that  holds  as  a  hook;  an  impediment;  an 
  obstacle;  an  entanglement. 
 
  2.  The  act  of  catching,  as  on  a  hook,  etc 
 
  3.  A  stop  or  sudden  halt;  a  stoppage;  an  impediment;  a 
  temporary  obstruction;  an  obstacle;  as  a  hitch  in  one's 
  progress  or  utterance;  a  hitch  in  the  performance. 
 
  4.  A  sudden  movement  or  pull  a  pull  up  as  the  sailor  gave 
  his  trousers  a  hitch. 
 
  5.  (Naut.)  A  knot  or  noose  in  a  rope  which  can  be  readily 
  undone;  --  intended  for  a  temporary  fastening;  as  a  half 
  hitch;  a  clove  hitch;  a  timber  hitch,  etc 
 
  6.  (Geol.)  A  small  dislocation  of  a  bed  or  vein. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  hitch 
  n  1:  a  period  of  time  spent  in  military  service  [syn:  {enlistment}, 
  {term  of  enlistment},  {tour  of  duty},  {duty  tour},  {tour}] 
  2:  the  state  of  inactivity  following  an  interruption;  "the 
  negotiations  were  in  arrest";  "held  them  in  check"; 
  "during  the  halt  he  got  some  lunch";  "he  spent  the  entire 
  stay  in  his  room"  [syn:  {arrest},  {check},  {halt},  {stay}, 
  {stop},  {stoppage}] 
  3:  an  unforeseen  obstacle  [syn:  {hang-up},  {rub},  {snag}] 
  4:  connects  a  vehicle  to  the  load  that  it  pulls 
  5:  a  knot  that  can  be  undone  by  pulling  against  the  strain  that 
  holds  it 
  6:  something  that  impedes  or  is  burdensome  [syn:  {hindrance},  {preventive}, 
  {preventative},  {encumbrance},  {incumbrance},  {interference}] 
  7:  the  uneven  manner  of  walking  that  results  from  an  injured 
  leg  [syn:  {hobble},  {limp}] 
  v  1:  to  hook  or  entangle:  "One  foot  caught  in  the  stirrup"  [syn: 
  {catch}]  [ant:  {unhitch}] 
  2:  walk  impeded  by  some  physical  limitation  or  injury;  "The  old 
  woman  hobbles  down  to  the  store  every  day."  [syn:  {limp}, 
  {hobble}] 
  3:  jump  vertically,  with  legs  stiff  and  back  arched,  as  of 
  horses  [syn:  {buck},  {jerk}] 
  4:  travel  by  getting  free  rides  from  motorists  [syn:  {hitchhike}, 
  {thumb}] 




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