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ease

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ease


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Ease  \Ease\,  n.  [OE.  ese,  eise,  F.  aise;  akin  to  Pr  ais,  aise, 
  OIt.  asio,  It  agio;  of  uncertain  origin;  cf  L.  ansa  handle, 
  occasion,  opportunity.  Cf  {Agio},  {Disease}.] 
  1.  Satisfaction;  pleasure;  hence  accommodation; 
  entertainment.  [Obs.] 
 
  They  him  besought  Of  harbor  and  or  ease  as  for  hire 
  penny.  --Chaucer. 
 
  2.  Freedom  from  anything  that  pains  or  troubles;  as: 
  a  Relief  from  labor  or  effort;  rest;  quiet;  relaxation; 
  as  ease  of  body. 
 
  Usefulness  comes  by  labor,  wit  by  ease. 
  --Herbert. 
 
  Give  yourself  ease  from  the  fatigue  of  watching. 
  --Swift. 
  b  Freedom  from  care  solicitude,  or  anything  that  annoys 
  or  disquiets;  tranquillity;  peace;  comfort;  security; 
  as  ease  of  mind. 
 
  Among  these  nations  shalt  thou  find  no  ease. 
  --Deut. 
  xxviii.  65. 
 
  Take  thine  ease,  eat,  drink,  and  be  merry. 
  --Luke  xii. 
  19. 
  c  Freedom  from  constraint,  formality,  difficulty, 
  embarrassment,  etc.;  facility;  liberty;  naturalness; 
  --  said  of  manner,  style,  etc.;  as  ease  of  style,  of 
  behavior,  of  address. 
 
  True  ease  in  writing  comes  from  art,  not  chance. 
  --Pope. 
 
  Whate'er  he  did  was  done  with  so  much  ease,  In 
  him  alone  't  was  natural  to  please.  --Dryden. 
 
  {At  ease},  free  from  pain,  trouble,  or  anxiety.  ``His  soul 
  shall  dwell  at  ease.''  --Ps.  xxv.  12. 
 
  {Chapel  of  ease}.  See  under  {Chapel}. 
 
  {Ill  at  ease},  not  at  ease,  disquieted;  suffering;  anxious. 
 
 
  {To  stand  at  ease}  (Mil.),  to  stand  in  a  comfortable  attitude 
  in  one's  place  in  the  ranks. 
 
  {With  ease},  easily;  without  much  effort. 
 
  Syn:  Rest;  quiet;  repose;  comfortableness;  tranquility; 
  facility;  easiness;  readiness. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Ease  \Ease\,  v.  t.  &  i.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Eased};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Easing}.]  [OE.  esen,  eisen,  OF  aisier.  See  {Ease},  n.] 
  1.  To  free  from  anything  that  pains,  disquiets,  or  oppresses; 
  to  relieve  from  toil  or  care  to  give  rest,  repose,  or 
  tranquility  to  --  often  with  of  as  to  ease  of  pain; 
  ease  the  body  or  mind. 
 
  Eased  [from]  the  putting  off  These  troublesome 
  disguises  which  we  wear.  --Milton. 
 
  Sing,  and  I  'll  ease  thy  shoulders  of  thy  load. 
  --Dryden. 
 
  2.  To  render  less  painful  or  oppressive;  to  mitigate;  to 
  alleviate. 
 
  My  couch  shall  ease  my  complaint.  --Job  vii.  13. 
 
  3.  To  release  from  pressure  or  restraint;  to  move  gently;  to 
  lift  slightly;  to  shift  a  little;  as  to  ease  a  bar  or  nut 
  in  machinery. 
 
  4.  To  entertain;  to  furnish  with  accommodations.  [Obs.] 
  --Chaucer. 
 
  {To  ease  off},  {To  ease  away}  (Naut.),  to  slacken  a  rope 
  gradually. 
 
  {To  ease  a  ship}  (Naut.),  to  put  the  helm  hard,  or  regulate 
  the  sail,  to  prevent  pitching  when  closehauled. 
 
  {To  ease  the  helm}  (Naut.),  to  put  the  helm  more  nearly 
  amidships,  to  lessen  the  effect  on  the  ship,  or  the  strain 
  on  the  wheel  rope.  --Ham.  Nav.  Encyc. 
 
  Syn:  To  relieve;  disburden;  quiet;  calm;  tranquilize; 
  assuage;  alleviate;  allay;  mitigate;  appease;  pacify. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  ease 
  n  1:  freedom  from  difficulty  or  hardship  or  effort:  "he  rose 
  through  the  ranks  with  apparent  ease";  "they  put  it  into 
  containers  for  ease  of  transportation"  [syn:  {easiness}, 
  {simplicity}]  [ant:  {difficulty}] 
  2:  a  freedom  from  financial  difficulty  that  promotes  a 
  comfortable  state:  "a  life  of  luxury  and  ease";  "he  had 
  all  the  material  comforts  of  this  world"  [syn:  {comfort}] 
  3:  the  condition  of  being  comfortable  or  relieved  (especially 
  after  being  relieved  of  distress);  "he  enjoyed  his  relief 
  from  responsibility";  "getting  it  off  his  conscience  gave 
  him  some  ease"  [syn:  {relief}] 
  4:  freedom  from  constraint  or  embarrassment;  "I  am  never  at 
  ease  with  strangers"  [syn:  {informality}] 
  5:  freedom  from  activity  (work  or  strain  or  responsibility); 
  "took  his  repose  by  the  swimming  pool"  [syn:  {rest},  {repose}, 
  {relaxation}] 
  v  1:  move  gently  or  carefully;  "He  eased  himself  into  the  chair" 
  2:  ease  physically  [syn:  {comfort}] 
  3:  make  easier;  "you  could  facilitate  the  process  by  sharing 
  youor  knowledge"  [syn:  {facilitate},  {alleviate}] 
  4:  lessen  the  intensity  of  calm;  as  of  of  anxieties  and  fears 
  [syn:  {still},  {allay},  {relieve}] 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  Ease 
 
  General  purpose  parallel  programming  language,  combining  the 
  process  constructs  of  CSP  and  the  distributed  data  structures 
  of  Linda.  "Programming  with  Ease:  Semiotic  Definition  of  the 
  Language",  S.E.  Zenith,    Yale  U 
  TR-809,  Jul  1990. 
 
 
 
  From  V.E.R.A.  --  Virtual  Entity  of  Relevant  Acronyms  13  March  2001  [vera]: 
 
  EASE 
  Easy  Access  System  Europe  (Novell,  FTP) 
 
 




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