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handle

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handle


  6  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Handle  \Han"dle\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Handled};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Handling}  .]  [OE.  handlen,  AS  handian  akin  to  D.  handelen 
  to  trade  G.  handeln.  See  {Hand}.] 
  1.  To  touch;  to  feel  with  the  hand;  to  use  or  hold  with  the 
  hand. 
 
  Handle  me  and  see  for  a  spirit  hath  not  flesh. 
  --Luke  xxiv. 
  39. 
 
  About  his  altar,  handling  holy  things  --Milton. 
 
  2.  To  manage  in  using,  as  a  spade  or  a  musket;  to  wield; 
  often  to  manage  skillfully. 
 
  That  fellow  handles  his  bow  like  a  crowkeeper. 
  --Shak. 
 
  3.  To  accustom  to  the  hand;  to  work  upon  or  take  care  of 
  with  the  hands. 
 
  The  hardness  of  the  winters  forces  the  breeders  to 
  house  and  handle  their  colts  six  months  every  year. 
  --Sir  W. 
  Temple. 
 
  4.  To  receive  and  transfer;  to  have  pass  through  one's  hands; 
  hence  to  buy  and  sell  as  a  merchant  handles  a  variety 
  of  goods,  or  a  large  stock. 
 
  5.  To  deal  with  to  make  a  business  of 
 
  They  that  handle  the  law  knew  me  not  --Jer.  ii  8. 
 
  6.  To  treat;  to  use  well  or  ill. 
 
  How  wert  thou  handled  being  prisoner.  --Shak. 
 
  7.  To  manage;  to  control;  to  practice  skill  upon 
 
  You  shall  see  how  I  will  handle  her  --Shak. 
 
  8.  To  use  or  manage  in  writing  or  speaking;  to  treat,  as  a 
  theme,  an  argument,  or  an  objection. 
 
  We  will  handle  what  persons  are  apt  to  envy  others 
  --Bacon. 
 
  {To  handle  without  gloves}.  See  under  {Glove}.  [Colloq.] 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Handle  \Han"dle\,  v.  i. 
  To  use  the  hands. 
 
  They  have  hands,  but  they  handle  not  --Ps.  cxv.  7. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Handle  \Han"dle\,  n.  [AS.  handle.  See  {Hand}.] 
  1.  That  part  of  vessels,  instruments,  etc.,  which  is  held  in 
  the  hand  when  used  or  moved  as  the  haft  of  a  sword,  the 
  knob  of  a  door,  the  bail  of  a  kettle,  etc 
 
  2.  That  of  which  use  is  made  the  instrument  for  effecting  a 
  purpose;  a  tool.  --South. 
 
  {To  give  a  handle},  to  furnish  an  occasion  or  means 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  handle 
  n  :  the  part  of  an  object  designed  to  be  held  in  order  to  use  or 
  move  it  [syn:  {grip},  {handgrip},  {hold}] 
  v  1:  be  in  charge  of  act  on  or  dispose  of  "I  can  deal  with 
  this  crew  of  workers";  "This  blender  can't  handle  nuts"; 
  "She  managed  her  parents'  affairs  after  they  got  too 
  old"  [syn:  {manage},  {deal},  {care}] 
  2:  interact  in  a  certain  way  "Do  right  by  her";  "Treat  him 
  with  caution,  please"  [syn:  {treat},  {do  by}] 
  3:  deal  with  verbally  or  in  some  form  of  artistic  expression; 
  "This  book  deals  with  incest";  "The  course  covered  all  of 
  Western  Civilization"  [syn:  {cover},  {treat},  {work},  {plow}, 
  {deal},  {address}] 
  4:  touch,  lift,  or  hold  with  the  hands  [syn:  {palm}] 
  5:  handle  effectively;  "The  burglar  wielded  an  axe"  [syn:  {wield}] 
  6:  hold  and  move  repeatedly 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  handle  n.  1.  [from  CB  slang]  An  electronic  pseudonym;  a  `nom 
  de  guerre'  intended  to  conceal  the  user's  true  identity.  Network  and  BBS 
  handles  function  as  the  same  sort  of  simultaneous  concealment  and  display 
  one  finds  on  Citizen's  Band  radio,  from  which  the  term  was  adopted. 
  Use  of  grandiose  handles  is  characteristic  of  {warez  d00dz},  {cracker}s, 
  {weenie}s,  {spod}s,  and  other  lower  forms  of  network  life;  true 
  hackers  travel  on  their  own  reputations  rather  than  invented  legendry. 
  Compare  {nick},  {screen  name}.  2.  A  {magic  cookie},  often  in  the  form  of  a 
  numeric  index  into  some  array  somewhere,  through  which  you  can  manipulate 
  an  object  like  a  file  or  window.  The  form  `file  handle'  is  especially 
  common.  3.  [Mac]  A  pointer  to  a  pointer  to  dynamically-allocated  memory; 
  the  extra  level  of  indirection  allows  on-the-fly  memory  compaction  (to 
  cut  down  on  fragmentation)  or  aging  out  of  unused  resources,  with  minimal 
  impact  on  the  (possibly  multiple)  parts  of  the  larger  program  containing 
  references  to  the  allocated  memory.  Compare  {snap}  (to  snap  a  handle 
  would  defeat  its  purpose);  see  also  {aliasing  bug},  {dangling  pointer}. 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  handle 
 
  1.    (From  Citizen's  Band  amateur  radio  slang)  An 
  electronic  pseudonym  or  "nom  de  guerre"  intended  to  conceal 
  the  user's  true  identity.  Network  and  BBS  handles  function  as 
  the  same  sort  of  simultaneous  concealment  and  display  one 
  finds  on  CB 
 
  Use  of  grandiose  handles  is  characteristic  of  {cracker}s, 
  {weenie}s,  {spod}s,  and  other  lower  forms  of  network  life; 
  true  hackers  travel  on  their  own  reputations  rather  than 
  invented  legendry. 
 
  Compare  {nick}. 
 
  2.    (Macintosh)  A  pointer  to  a  pointer  to 
  dynamically-allocated  memory.  The  extra  level  of  indirection 
  allows  on-the-fly  memory  compaction  (to  cut  down  on 
  {fragmentation})  or  garbage  collection  of  unused  resources, 
  with  minimal  impact  on  the  (possibly  multiple)  parts  of  the 
  larger  program  containing  references  to  the  allocated  memory. 
 
  Compare  {snap}  (to  snap  a  handle  would  defeat  its  purpose). 
  See  also  {aliasing  bug},  {dangling  pointer}. 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
  (1995-02-28) 
 
 




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