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debt

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debt


  4  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Debt  \Debt\,  n.  [OE.  dette,  F.  dette,  LL  debita,  fr  L.  debitus 
  owed,  p.  p.  of  debere  to  owe,  prop.,  to  have  on  loan;  de-  + 
  habere  to  have  See  {Habit},  and  cf  {Debit},  {Due}.] 
  1.  That  which  is  due  from  one  person  to  another,  whether 
  money,  goods,  or  services;  that  which  one  person  is  bound 
  to  pay  to  another,  or  to  perform  for  his  benefit;  thing 
  owed;  obligation;  liability. 
 
  Your  son,  my  lord,  has  paid  a  soldier's  debt. 
  --Shak. 
 
  When  you  run  in  debt,  you  give  to  another  power  over 
  your  liberty.  --Franklin. 
 
  2.  A  duty  neglected  or  violated;  a  fault;  a  sin;  a  trespass. 
  ``Forgive  us  our  debts.''  --Matt.  vi  12. 
 
  3.  (Law)  An  action  at  law  to  recover  a  certain  specified  sum 
  of  money  alleged  to  be  due.  --Burrill. 
 
  {Bond  debt},  {Book  debt},  etc  See  under  {Bond},  {Book},  etc 
 
 
  {Debt  of  nature},  death. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  debt 
  n  1:  the  state  of  owing  money;  "he  is  badly  in  debt" 
  2:  the  amount  that  is  owed 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Debt 
  The  Mosaic  law  encouraged  the  practice  of  lending  (Deut.  15:7; 
  Ps  37:26;  Matt.  5:42);  but  it  forbade  the  exaction  of  interest 
  except  from  foreigners.  Usury  was  strongly  condemned  (Prov. 
  28:8;  Ezek.  18:8,  13,  17;  22:12;  Ps  15:5).  On  the  Sabbatical 
  year  all  pecuniary  obligations  were  cancelled  (Deut.  15:1-11). 
  These  regulations  prevented  the  accumulation  of  debt. 
 
 
  From  THE  DEVIL'S  DICTIONARY  ((C)1911  Released  April  15  1993)  [devils]: 
 
  DEBT,  n.  An  ingenious  substitute  for  the  chain  and  whip  of  the  slave- 
  driver. 
 
  As  pent  in  an  aquarium,  the  troutlet 
  Swims  round  and  round  his  tank  to  find  an  outlet, 
  Pressing  his  nose  against  the  glass  that  holds  him 
  Nor  ever  sees  the  prison  that  enfolds  him 
  So  the  poor  debtor,  seeing  naught  around  him 
  Yet  feels  the  narrow  limits  that  impound  him 
  Grieves  at  his  debt  and  studies  to  evade  it 
  And  finds  at  last  he  might  as  well  have  paid  it 
  Barlow  S.  Vode 
 
 




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