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harlot

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harlot


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Harlot  \Har"lot\,  n.  [OE.  harlot,  herlot,  a  vagabond,  OF 
  harlot,  herlot,  arlot;  cf  Pr  arlot,  Sp  arlote  It 
  arlotto;  of  uncertain  origin.] 
  1.  A  churl;  a  common  man;  a  person,  male  or  female,  of  low 
  birth.  --[Obs.] 
 
  He  was  a  gentle  harlot  and  a  kind  --Chaucer. 
 
  2.  A  person  given  to  low  conduct;  a  rogue;  a  cheat;  a  rascal. 
  [Obs.]  --Chaucer. 
 
  3.  A  woman  who  prostitutes  her  body  for  hire;  a  prostitute;  a 
  common  woman;  a  strumpet. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Harlot  \Har"lot\,  a. 
  Wanton;  lewd;  low  base.  --Shak. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Harlot  \Har"lot\,  v.  i. 
  To  play  the  harlot;  to  practice  lewdness.  --Milton. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  harlot 
  n  :  a  woman  who  engages  in  sexual  intercourse  for  money  [syn:  {prostitute}, 
  {cocotte},  {whore},  {trollop},  {bawd},  {tart},  {cyprian}, 
  {fancy  woman},  {working  girl},  {sporting  lady},  {lady  of 
  pleasure},  {woman  of  the  street}] 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Harlot 
  (1.)  Heb.  zonah  (Gen.  34:31;  38:15).  In  verses  21,  22  the  Hebrew 
  word  used  in  _kedeshah_,  i.e.,  a  woman  consecrated  or  devoted  to 
  prostitution  in  connection  with  the  abominable  worship  of 
  Asherah  or  Astarte,  the  Syrian  Venus.  This  word  is  also  used  in 
  Deut.  23:17;  Hos.  4:14.  Thus  Tamar  sat  by  the  wayside  as  a 
  consecrated  kedeshah 
 
  It  has  been  attempted  to  show  that  Rahab,  usually  called  a 
  harlot"  (Josh.  2:1;  6:17;  Heb.  11:31;  James  2:25),  was  only  an 
  innkeeper.  This  interpretation,  however,  cannot  be  maintained. 
 
  Jephthah's  mother  is  called  a  "strange  woman"  (Judg.  11:2). 
  This  however,  merely  denotes  that  she  was  of  foreign 
  extraction. 
 
  In  the  time  of  Solomon  harlots  appeared  openly  in  the  streets, 
  and  he  solemnly  warns  against  association  with  them  (Prov.  7:12; 
  9:14.  See  also  Jer.  3:2;  Ezek.  16:24,  25,  31).  The  Revised 
  Version,  following  the  LXX.,  has  "and  the  harlots  washed,"  etc., 
  instead  of  the  rendering  of  the  Authorized  Version,  "now  they 
  washed,"  of  1  Kings  22:38. 
 
  To  commit  fornication  is  metaphorically  used  for  to  practice 
  idolatry  (Jer.  3:1;  Ezek.  16:15;  Hos.  throughout);  hence 
  Jerusalem  is  spoken  of  as  a  harlot  (Isa.  1:21). 
 
  (2.)  Heb.  nokriyah  the  "strange  woman"  (1  Kings  11:1;  Prov. 
  5:20;  7:5;  23:27).  Those  so  designated  were  Canaanites  and  other 
  Gentiles  (Josh.  23:13).  To  the  same  class  belonged  the 
  "foolish",  i.e.,  the  sinful,  "woman." 
 
  In  the  New  Testament  the  Greek  pornai  plural,  "harlots," 
  occurs  in  Matt.  21:31,32,  where  they  are  classed  with  publicans; 
  Luke  15:30;  1  Cor.  6:15,16;  Heb.  11:31;  James  2:25.  It  is  used 
  symbolically  in  Rev.  17:1,  5,  15,  16;  19:2. 
 




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