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emerald

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emerald


  7  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Emerald  \Em"er*ald\,  n.  [OE.  emeraude,  OF  esmeraude  esmeralde, 
  F.  ['e]meraude,  L.  smaragdus  fr  Gr  ?;  cf  ?kr.  marakata.] 
  1.  (Min.)  A  precious  stone  of  a  rich  green  color,  a  variety 
  of  beryl.  See  {Beryl}. 
 
  2.  (Print.)  A  kind  of  type  in  size  between  minion  and 
  nonpare?l.  It  is  used  by  English  printers. 
 
  Note:  [hand]  This  line  is  printed  in  the  type  called  emerald. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Emerald  \Em"er*ald\,  a. 
  Of  a  rich  green  color,  like  that  of  the  emerald.  ``Emerald 
  meadows.''  --Byron. 
 
  {Emerald  fish}  (Zo["o]l.),  a  fish  of  the  Gulf  of  Mexico 
  ({Gobionellus  oceanicus}),  remarkable  for  the  brilliant 
  green  and  blue  color  of  the  base  of  the  tongue;  --  whence 
  the  name  --  called  also  {esmeralda}. 
 
  {Emerald  green},  a  very  durable  pigment,  of  a  vivid  light 
  green  color,  made  from  the  arseniate  of  copper;  green 
  bice;  Scheele's  green;  --  also  used  adjectively;  as 
  emerald  green  crystals. 
 
  {Emerald  Isle},  a  name  given  to  Ireland  on  account  of  the 
  brightness  of  its  verdure. 
 
  {Emerald  spodumene},  or  {Lithia  emerald}.  (Min.)  See 
  {Hiddenite}. 
 
  {Emerald  nickel}.  (Min.)  See  {Zaratite}. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Beryl  \Ber"yl\  (b[e^]r"[i^]l),  n.  [F.  b['e]ryl,  OF  beril,  L. 
  beryllus  Gr  bh`ryllos,  prob.  fr  Skr.  vai[dsdot][=u]rya. 
  Cf  {Brilliant}.]  (Min.) 
  A  mineral  of  great  hardness,  and  when  transparent,  of  much 
  beauty.  It  occurs  in  hexagonal  prisms,  commonly  of  a  green  or 
  bluish  green  color,  but  also  yellow,  pink,  and  white.  It  is  a 
  silicate  of  aluminium  and  glucinum  (beryllium).  The 
  {aquamarine}  is  a  transparent,  sea-green  variety  used  as  a 
  gem.  The  {emerald}  is  another  variety  highly  prized  in 
  jewelry,  and  distinguished  by  its  deep  color,  which  is 
  probably  due  to  the  presence  of  a  little  oxide  of  chromium. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  emerald 
  n  1:  a  green  transparent  form  of  beryl;  highly  valued  as  a 
  gemstone 
  2:  a  transparent  piece  of  emerald  that  has  been  cut  and 
  polished  and  is  valued  as  a  precious  gem 
  3:  the  green  color  of  an  emerald 
 
  From  U.S.  Gazetteer  (1990)  [gazetteer]: 
 
  Emerald,  PA 
  Zip  code(s):  18080 
  Emerald,  WI 
  Zip  code(s):  54012 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  Emerald 
 
  An  {object-oriented}  distributed  programming  language  and 
  environment  developed  at  the  {University  of  Washington}  in  the 
  early  1980s.  Emeral  was  the  successor  to  {EPL}.  It  is 
  {strongly  typed}  and  uses  {signature}s  and  {prototype}s  rather 
  than  {inheritance}. 
 
  ["Distribution  and  Abstract  Types  in  Emerald",  A.  Black  et  al 
  IEEE  Trans  Soft  Eng  SE-13(1):65-76  (Jan  1987)]. 
 
  (1994-11-09) 
 
 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Emerald 
  Heb.  nophek  (Ex.  28:18;  39:11);  i.e.,  the  "glowing  stone", 
  probably  the  carbuncle,  a  precious  stone  in  the  breastplate  of 
  the  high  priest.  It  is  mentioned  (Rev.  21:19)  as  one  of  the 
  foundations  of  the  New  Jerusalem.  The  name  given  to  this  stone 
  in  the  New  Testament  Greek  is  smaragdos  which  means  "live 
  coal." 
 




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