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lagmore about lag

lag


  11  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Lag  \Lag\,  v.  i.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Lagged};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Lagging}.] 
  To  walk  or  more  slowly;  to  stay  or  fall  behind;  to  linger  or 
  loiter.  ``I  shall  not  lag  behind.''  --Milton. 
 
  Syn:  To  loiter;  linger;  saunter;  delay;  be  tardy. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Lag  \Lag\,  a.  [Of  Celtic  origin:  cf  Gael.  &  Ir  lagweak 
  feeble,  faint,  W.  llag,  llac,  slack,  loose,  remiss,  sluggish; 
  prob.  akin  to  E.  lax,  languid.] 
  1.  Coming  tardily  after  or  behind;  slow;  tardy.  [Obs.] 
 
  Came  too  lag  to  see  him  buried.  --Shak. 
 
  2.  Last  long-delayed;  --  obsolete,  except  in  the  phrase  lag 
  end  ``The  lag  end  of  my  life.''  --Shak. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Lag  \Lag\,  v.  t. 
  1.  To  cause  to  lag;  to  slacken.  [Obs.]  ``To  lag  his  flight.'' 
  --Heywood. 
 
  2.  (Mach.)  To  cover,  as  the  cylinder  of  a  steam  engine,  with 
  lags.  See  {Lag},  n.,  4. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Lag  \Lag\,  n. 
  One  transported  for  a  crime.  [Slang,  Eng.] 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Lag  \Lag\,  v.  t. 
  To  transport  for  crime.  [Slang,  Eng.] 
 
  She  lags  us  if  we  poach.  --De  Quincey. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Lag  \Lag\,  n. 
  1.  One  who  lags;  that  which  comes  in  last  [Obs.]  ``The  lag 
  of  all  the  flock.''  --Pope. 
 
  2.  The  fag-end;  the  rump;  hence  the  lowest  class. 
 
  The  common  lag  of  people.  --Shak. 
 
  3.  The  amount  of  retardation  of  anything  as  of  a  valve  in  a 
  steam  engine,  in  opening  or  closing. 
 
  4.  A  stave  of  a  cask,  drum,  etc.;  especially  (Mach.),  one  of 
  the  narrow  boards  or  staves  forming  the  covering  of  a 
  cylindrical  object,  as  a  boiler,  or  the  cylinder  of  a 
  carding  machine  or  a  steam  engine. 
 
  5.  (Zo["o]l.)  See  {Graylag}. 
 
  {Lag  of  the  tide},  the  interval  by  which  the  time  of  high 
  water  falls  behind  the  mean  time,  in  the  first  and  third 
  quarters  of  the  moon;  --  opposed  to  {priming}  of  the  tide, 
  or  the  acceleration  of  the  time  of  high  water,  in  the 
  second  and  fourth  quarters;  depending  on  the  relative 
  positions  of  the  sun  and  moon. 
 
  {Lag  screw},  an  iron  bolt  with  a  square  head,  a  sharp-edged 
  thread,  and  a  sharp  point,  adapted  for  screwing  into  wood; 
  a  screw  for  fastening  lags. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Lag  \Lag\,  n. 
  The  failing  behind  or  retardation  of  one  phenomenon  with 
  respect  to  another  to  which  it  is  closely  related;  as  the 
  lag  of  magnetization  compared  with  the  magnetizing  force 
  (hysteresis);  the  lag  of  the  current  in  an  alternating 
  circuit  behind  the  impressed  electro-motive  force  which 
  produced  it 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  lag 
  n  1:  the  act  of  slowing  down  or  falling  behind  [syn:  {slowdown}, 
  {retardation}] 
  2:  the  time  between  one  event,  process,  or  period  and  another 
  [syn:  {interim}] 
  3:  one  of  several  thin  pieces  of  wood  forming  the  sides  of  a 
  barrel  or  bucket  [syn:  {stave}] 
  v  1:  hang  back  or  fall  (behind)  in  movement,  progress, 
  development,  etc  [syn:  {dawdle},  {fall  back},  {fall 
  behind}] 
  2:  lock  up  in  jail  [syn:  {imprison},  {incarcerate},  {immure},  {put 
  behind  bars},  {jail},  {jug},  {gaol},  {put  away},  {remand}] 
  3:  cover  with  lagging  to  prevent  heat  loss  "lag  pipes" 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  lag  n.  [MUD,  IRC;  very  common]  When  used  without  qualification 
  this  is  synomous  with  {netlag}.  Curiously,  people  will  often  complain 
  "I'm  really  lagged"  when  in  fact  it  is  their  server  or  network  connection 
  that  is  lagging. 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  lag 
 
  {netlag} 
 
 
 
  From  V.E.R.A.  --  Virtual  Entity  of  Relevant  Acronyms  13  March  2001  [vera]: 
 
  LAG 
  Logical  Address  Group  (ION) 
 
 




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