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smart


  9  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Smart  \Smart\,  a.  [Compar.  {Smarter};  superl.  {Smartest}.]  [OE. 
  smerte.  See  {Smart},  v.  i.] 
  1.  Causing  a  smart;  pungent;  pricking;  as  a  smart  stroke  or 
  taste. 
 
  How  smart  lash  that  speech  doth  give  my  conscience. 
  --Shak. 
 
  2.  Keen;  severe;  poignant;  as  smart  pain. 
 
  3.  Vigorous;  sharp;  severe.  ``Smart  skirmishes,  in  which  many 
  fell.''  --Clarendon. 
 
  4.  Accomplishing,  or  able  to  accomplish,  results  quickly; 
  active;  sharp;  clever.  [Colloq.] 
 
  5.  Efficient;  vigorous;  brilliant.  ``The  stars  shine 
  smarter.''  --Dryden. 
 
  6.  Marked  by  acuteness  or  shrewdness;  quick  in  suggestion  or 
  reply;  vivacious;  witty;  as  a  smart  reply;  a  smart 
  saying. 
 
  Who  for  the  poor  renown  of  being  smart  Would  leave 
  a  sting  within  a  brother's  heart?  --Young. 
 
  A  sentence  or  two  .  .  .  which  I  thought  very  smart. 
  --Addison. 
 
  7.  Pretentious;  showy;  spruce;  as  a  smart  gown. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Smart  \Smart\,  v.  i.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Smarted};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Smarting}.]  [OE.  smarten,  AS  smeortan  akin  to  D.  smarten, 
  smerten,  G.  schmerzen  OHG.  smerzan  Dan.  smerte,  SW 
  sm["a]rta,  D.  smart,  smert,  a  pain,  G.  schmerz  Ohg.  smerzo 
  and  probably  to  L.  mordere  to  bite;  cf  Gr  ????,  ?????, 
  terrible,  fearful,  Skr.  m?d  to  rub,  crush.  Cf  {Morsel}.] 
  1.  To  feel  a  lively,  pungent  local  pain;  --  said  of  some  part 
  of  the  body  as  the  seat  of  irritation;  as  my  finger 
  smarts;  these  wounds  smart.  --Chaucer.  --Shak. 
 
  2.  To  feel  a  pungent  pain  of  mind;  to  feel  sharp  pain  or 
  grief;  to  suffer;  to  feel  the  sting  of  evil. 
 
  No  creature  smarts  so  little  as  a  fool.  --Pope. 
 
  He  that  is  surety  for  a  stranger  shall  smart  for  it 
  --Prov.  xi 
  15. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Smart  \Smart\,  v.  t. 
  To  cause  a  smart  in  ``A  goad  that  .  .  .  smarts  the  flesh.'' 
  --T.  Adams. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Smart  \Smart\,  n.  [OE.  smerte.  See  {Smart},  v.  i.] 
  1.  Quick,  pungent,  lively  pain;  a  pricking  local  pain,  as  the 
  pain  from  puncture  by  nettles.  ``In  pain's  smart.'' 
  --Chaucer. 
 
  2.  Severe,  pungent  pain  of  mind;  pungent  grief;  as  the  smart 
  of  affliction. 
 
  To  stand  'twixt  us  and  our  deserved  smart.  --Milton. 
 
  Counsel  mitigates  the  greatest  smart.  --Spenser. 
 
  3.  A  fellow  who  affects  smartness,  briskness,  and  vivacity;  a 
  dandy.  [Slang]  --Fielding. 
 
  4.  Smart  money  (see  below).  [Canf] 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  smart 
  adj  1:  showing  mental  alertness  and  calculation  and  resourcefulness 
  [ant:  {stupid}] 
  2:  elegant  and  stylish;  "chic  elegance";  "a  smart  new  dress"; 
  "a  suit  of  voguish  cut"  [syn:  {chic},  {voguish}] 
  3:  characterized  by  quickness  and  ease  in  learning;  "some 
  children  are  brighter  in  one  subject  than  another";  "smart 
  children  talk  earlier  than  the  average"  [syn:  {bright}] 
  4:  improperly  forward  or  bold;  "don't  be  fresh  with  me"; 
  "impertinent  of  a  child  to  lecture  a  grownup";  "an 
  impudent  boy  given  to  insulting  strangers"  [syn:  {fresh}, 
  {impertinent},  {impudent},  {overbold},  {saucy}] 
  5:  of  or  associated  with  people  of  fashion;  "the  smart  set" 
  6:  marked  by  smartness  in  dress  and  manners;  "a  dapper  young 
  man";  "a  jaunty  red  hat"  [syn:  {dapper},  {dashing},  {jaunty}, 
  {natty},  {raffish},  {rakish},  {snappy},  {spruce}] 
  n  :  a  stinging  pain  [syn:  {smarting}] 
  v  :  be  the  source  of  pain  [syn:  {ache},  {hurt}] 
 
  From  Jargon  File  (4.2.3,  23  NOV  2000)  [jargon]: 
 
  smart  adj  Said  of  a  program  that  does  the  {Right  Thing}  in  a 
  wide  variety  of  complicated  circumstances.  There  is  a  difference  between 
  calling  a  program  smart  and  calling  it  intelligent;  in  particular, 
  there  do  not  exist  any  intelligent  programs  (yet  --  see  {AI-complete}). 
  Compare  {robust}  (smart  programs  can  be  {brittle}). 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  SMART 
 
  For  {MS-DOS}? 
 
  [{Jargon  File}] 
 
 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  smart 
 
  1.    Said  of  a  program  that  does  the  {Right  Thing} 
  in  a  wide  variety  of  complicated  circumstances.  There  is  a 
  difference  between  calling  a  program  smart  and  calling  it 
  intelligent;  in  particular,  there  do  not  exist  any  intelligent 
  programs  (yet  -  see  {AI-complete}). 
 
  Compare  {robust}  (smart  programs  can  be  {brittle}). 
 
  2.    Incorporating  some  kind  of  digital  electronics. 
 
  (1995-03-28) 
 
 
 
  From  V.E.R.A.  --  Virtual  Entity  of  Relevant  Acronyms  13  March  2001  [vera]: 
 
  SMART 
  Self-Monitoring,  Analysis  and  Reporting  Technology  (HDD,  IDE,  Conner,  IBM,  Quantum,  Seagate,  WD),  "S.M.A.R.T." 
 
 




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