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challenge

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challenge


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Favor  \Fa"vor\,  n.  [Written  also  favour.]  [OF.  favor,  F.  faveur, 
  L.  favor,  fr  favere  to  be  favorable,  cf  Skr.  bh[=a]vaya  to 
  further,  foster,  causative  of  bh[=u]  to  become  be  Cf  {Be}. 
  In  the  phrase  to  curry  favor,  favor  is  prob.  for  favel  a 
  horse.  See  2d  {Favel}.] 
  1.  Kind  regard;  propitious  aspect;  countenance;  friendly 
  disposition;  kindness;  good  will 
 
  Hath  crawled  into  the  favor  of  the  king.  --Shak. 
 
  2.  The  act  of  countenancing,  or  the  condition  of  being 
  countenanced,  or  regarded  propitiously;  support; 
  promotion;  befriending. 
 
  But  found  no  favor  in  his  lady's  eyes.  --Dryden. 
 
  And  Jesus  increased  in  wisdom  and  stature,  and  in 
  favor  with  God  and  man.  --Luke  ii  52. 
 
  3.  A  kind  act  or  office;  kindness  done  or  granted; 
  benevolence  shown  by  word  or  deed;  an  act  of  grace  or  good 
  will  as  distinct  from  justice  or  remuneration. 
 
  Beg  one  favor  at  thy  gracious  hand.  --Shak. 
 
  4.  Mildness  or  mitigation  of  punishment;  lenity. 
 
  I  could  not  discover  the  lenity  and  favor  of  this 
  sentence.  --Swift. 
 
  5.  The  object  of  regard;  person  or  thing  favored. 
 
  All  these  his  wondrous  works  but  chiefly  man,  His 
  chief  delight  and  favor.  --Milton. 
 
  6.  A  gift  or  represent;  something  bestowed  as  an  evidence  of 
  good  will  a  token  of  love;  a  knot  of  ribbons;  something 
  worn  as  a  token  of  affection;  as  a  marriage  favor  is  a 
  bunch  or  knot  of  white  ribbons  or  white  flowers  worn  at  a 
  wedding. 
 
  Wear  thou  this  favor  for  me  and  stick  it  in  thy 
  cap.  --Shak. 
 
  7.  Appearance;  look  countenance;  face.  [Obs.] 
 
  This  boy  is  fair,  of  female  favor.  --Shak. 
 
  8.  (Law)  Partiality;  bias.  --Bouvier. 
 
  9.  A  letter  or  epistle;  --  so  called  in  civility  or 
  compliment;  as  your  favor  of  yesterday  is  received. 
 
  10.  pl  Love  locks.  [Obs.]  --Wright. 
 
  {Challenge}  {to  the  favor  or  for  favor}  (Law),  the  challenge 
  of  a  juror  on  grounds  not  sufficient  to  constitute  a 
  principal  challenge,  but  sufficient  to  give  rise  to  a 
  probable  suspicion  of  favor  or  bias,  such  as  acquaintance, 
  business  relation,  etc  See  {Principal  challenge},  under 
  {Challenge}. 
 
  {In  favor  of},  upon  the  side  of  favorable  to  for  the 
  advantage  of 
 
  {In  favor  with},  favored,  countenanced,  or  encouraged  by 
 
  {To  curry  favor}  [see  the  etymology  of  {Favor},  above],  to 
  seek  to  gain  favor  by  flattery,  caresses,  kindness,  or 
  officious  civilities. 
 
  {With  one's  favor},  or  {By  one's  favor},  with  leave  by  kind 
  permission. 
 
  But  with  your  favor,  I  will  treat  it  here 
  --Dryden. 
 
  Syn:  Kindness;  countenance;  patronage;  support;  lenity; 
  grace;  gift;  present;  benefit. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Challenge  \Chal"lenge\,  n.  [OE.  chalenge  claim,  accusation, 
  challenge,  OF  chalenge,  chalonge  claim,  accusation, 
  contest,  fr  L.  calumnia  false  accusation,  chicanery.  See 
  {Calumny}.] 
  1.  An  invitation  to  engage  in  a  contest  or  controversy  of  any 
  kind  a  defiance;  specifically,  a  summons  to  fight  a  duel; 
  also  the  letter  or  message  conveying  the  summons. 
 
  A  challenge  to  controversy.  --Goldsmith. 
 
  2.  The  act  of  a  sentry  in  halting  any  one  who  appears  at  his 
  post  and  demanding  the  countersign. 
 
  3.  A  claim  or  demand.  [Obs.] 
 
  There  must  be  no  challenge  of  superiority. 
  --Collier. 
 
  4.  (Hunting)  The  opening  and  crying  of  hounds  at  first 
  finding  the  scent  of  their  game. 
 
  5.  (Law)  An  exception  to  a  juror  or  to  a  member  of  a  court 
  martial,  coupled  with  a  demand  that  he  should  be  held 
  incompetent  to  act  the  claim  of  a  party  that  a  certain 
  person  or  persons  shall  not  sit  in  trial  upon  him  or  his 
  cause  --Blackstone 
 
  6.  An  exception  to  a  person  as  not  legally  qualified  to  vote. 
  The  challenge  must  be  made  when  the  ballot  is  offered.  [U. 
  S.] 
 
  {Challenge  to  the  array}  (Law),  an  exception  to  the  whole 
  panel. 
 
  {Challenge  to  the  favor},  the  alleging  a  special  cause  the 
  sufficiency  of  which  is  to  be  left  to  those  whose  duty  and 
  office  it  is  to  decide  upon  it 
 
  {Challenge  to  the  polls},  an  exception  taken  to  any  one  or 
  more  of  the  individual  jurors  returned. 
 
  {Peremptory  challenge},  a  privilege  sometimes  allowed  to 
  defendants,  of  challenging  a  certain  number  of  jurors 
  (fixed  by  statute  in  different  States)  without  assigning 
  any  cause 
 
  {Principal  challenge},  that  which  the  law  allows  to  be 
  sufficient  if  found  to  be  true. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Challenge  \Chal"lenge\,  v.  i. 
  To  assert  a  right  to  claim  a  place 
 
  Where  nature  doth  with  merit  challenge.  --Shak. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Challenge  \Chal"lenge\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Challenged};  p.  pr 
  &  vb  n.  {Challenging}.]  [OE.  chalengen  to  accuse,  claim,  OF 
  chalengier  chalongier  to  claim,  accuse,  dispute,  fr  L. 
  calumniar  to  attack  with  false  accusations.  See  {Challenge}, 
  n.,  and  cf  {Calumniate}.] 
  1.  To  call  to  a  contest  of  any  kind  to  call  to  answer;  to 
  defy. 
 
  I  challenge  any  man  to  make  any  pretense  to  power  by 
  right  of  fatherhood.  --Locke. 
 
  2.  To  call  invite,  or  summon  to  answer  for  an  offense  by 
  personal  combat. 
 
  By  this  I  challenge  him  to  single  fight.  --Shak. 
 
  3.  To  claim  as  due;  to  demand  as  a  right 
 
  Challenge  better  terms.  --Addison. 
 
  4.  To  censure;  to  blame.  [Obs.] 
 
  He  complained  of  the  emperors  .  .  .  and  challenged 
  them  for  that  he  had  no  greater  revenues  .  .  .  from 
  them  --Holland. 
 
  5.  (Mil.)  To  question  or  demand  the  countersign  from  (one  who 
  attempts  to  pass  the  lines);  as  the  sentinel  challenged 
  us  with  ``Who  comes  there?'' 
 
  6.  To  take  exception  to  question;  as  to  challenge  the 
  accuracy  of  a  statement  or  of  a  quotation. 
 
  7.  (Law)  To  object  to  or  take  exception  to  as  to  a  juror,  or 
  member  of  a  court. 
 
  8.  To  object  to  the  reception  of  the  vote  of  as  on  the 
  ground  that  the  person  in  not  qualified  as  a  voter.  [U. 
  S.] 
 
  {To  challenge  to  the}  {array,  favor,  polls}.  See  under 
  {Challenge},  n. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  challenge 
  n  1:  a  demanding  or  stimulating  situation;  "they  reacted 
  irrationally  to  the  challenge  of  Russian  power" 
  2:  a  call  to  engage  in  a  contest  or  fight 
  3:  questioning  a  statement  and  demanding  an  explanation;  "he 
  challenged  the  assumption  that  Japan  is  our  enemy" 
  4:  a  formal  objection  to  the  selection  of  a  particular  person 
  as  a  juror 
  5:  a  demand  by  a  sentry  for  a  password  or  identification 
  v  1:  take  exception  to  "She  challenged  his  claims"  [syn:  {dispute}, 
  {gainsay}] 
  2:  issue  a  challenge  to  "Fischer  challenged  Spassky  to  a 
  match" 
  3:  ask  for  identification;  "The  illegal  immigrant  was 
  challenged  by  the  border  guard" 
  4:  raise  a  formal  objection  in  a  court  of  law  [syn:  {take 
  exception}] 




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