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gin

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gin


  9  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Gin  \Gin\,  prep.  [AS.  ge['a]n.  See  {Again}.] 
  Against;  near  by  towards;  as  gin  night.  [Scot.]  --A.  Ross 
  (1778). 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Gin  \Gin\,  conj.  [See  {Gin},  prep.] 
  If  [Scotch]  --Jamieson. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Gin  \Gin\,  v.  i.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Gan},  {Gon}  (?),  or  {Gun}  (?); 
  p.  pr  &  vb  n.  {Ginning}.]  [OE.  ginnen,  AS  ginnan  (in 
  comp.),  prob.  orig.,  to  open  cut  open  cf  OHG.  inginnan  to 
  begin,  open  cut  open  and  prob.  akin  to  AS  g[=i]nan  to 
  yawn,  and  E.  yawn.  ?  See  {Yawn},  v.  i.,  and  cf  {Begin}.] 
  To  begin;  --  often  followed  by  an  infinitive  without  to  as 
  gan  tell  See  {Gan}.  [Obs.  or  Archaic]  ``He  gan  to  pray.'' 
  --Chaucer. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Gin  \Gin\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Ginned};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Ginning}.] 
  1.  To  catch  in  a  trap.  [Obs.]  --Beau.  &  Fl 
 
  2.  To  clear  of  seeds  by  a  machine;  as  to  gin  cotton. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Gin  \Gin\,  n.  [Contr.  from  Geneva.  See  2d  {Geneva}.] 
  A  strong  alcoholic  liquor,  distilled  from  rye  and  barley,  and 
  flavored  with  juniper  berries;  --  also  called  {Hollands}  and 
  {Holland  gin},  because  originally,  and  still  very 
  extensively,  manufactured  in  Holland.  Common  gin  is  usually 
  flavored  with  turpentine. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Gin  \Gin\,  n.  [A  contraction  of  engine.] 
  1.  Contrivance;  artifice;  a  trap;  a  snare.  --Chaucer. 
  Spenser. 
 
  2. 
  a  A  machine  for  raising  or  moving  heavy  weights, 
  consisting  of  a  tripod  formed  of  poles  united  at  the 
  top  with  a  windlass,  pulleys,  ropes,  etc 
  b  (Mining)  A  hoisting  drum,  usually  vertical;  a  whim. 
 
  3.  A  machine  for  separating  the  seeds  from  cotton;  a  cotton 
  gin. 
 
  Note:  The  name  is  also  given  to  an  instrument  of  torture 
  worked  with  screws,  and  to  a  pump  moved  by  rotary 
  sails. 
 
  {Gin  block},  a  simple  form  of  tackle  block,  having  one  wheel, 
  over  which  a  rope  runs;  --  called  also  {whip  gin}, 
  {rubbish  pulley},  and  {monkey  wheel}. 
 
  {Gin  power},  a  form  of  horse  power  for  driving  a  cotton  gin. 
 
 
  {Gin  race},  or  {Gin  ring},  the  path  of  the  horse  when  putting 
  a  gin  in  motion.  --Halliwell. 
 
  {Gin  saw},  a  saw  used  in  a  cotton  gin  for  drawing  the  fibers 
  through  the  grid,  leaving  the  seed  in  the  hopper. 
 
  {Gin  wheel}. 
  a  In  a  cotton  gin,  a  wheel  for  drawing  the  fiber  through 
  the  grid;  a  brush  wheel  to  clean  away  the  lint. 
  b  (Mining)  the  drum  of  a  whim. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  gin 
  n  1:  strong  liquor  flavored  with  juniper  berries 
  2:  a  trap  for  birds  or  small  mammals;  often  has  a  noose  [syn:  {snare}, 
  {noose}] 
  3:  a  machine  that  separates  the  seeds  from  raw  cotton  fibers 
  [syn:  {cotton  gin}] 
  4:  a  form  of  rummy  in  which  a  player  can  go  out  if  the  cards 
  remaining  in  their  hand  total  less  than  10  points  [syn:  {gin 
  rummy},  {knock  rummy}] 
  v  1:  separate  the  seeds  from  (cotton)  with  a  cotton  gin 
  2:  trap  with  a  gin;  "gin  game" 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  GIN 
 
  A  special-purpose  {macro  assembler}  used  to  build  the  {GEORGE 
  3}  {operating  system}  for  {ICL1900}  series  computers. 
 
  (1994-11-02) 
 
 
 
  From  Easton's  1897  Bible  Dictionary  [easton]: 
 
  Gin 
  a  trap.  (1.)  Ps  140:5,  141:9,  Amos  3:5,  the  Hebrew  word  used 
  _mokesh_,  means  a  noose  or  "snare,"  as  it  is  elsewhere  rendered 
  (Ps.  18:5;  Prov.  13:14,  etc.). 
 
  (2.)  Job  18:9,  Isa.  8:14,  Heb.  pah,  a  plate  or  thin  layer;  and 
  hence  a  net,  a  snare,  trap,  especially  of  a  fowler  (Ps.  69:  22, 
  "Let  their  table  before  them  become  a  net;"  Amos  3:5,  "Doth  a 
  bird  fall  into  a  net  [pah]  upon  the  ground  where  there  is  no 
  trap-stick  [mokesh]  for  her?  doth  the  net  [pah]  spring  up  from 
  the  ground  and  take  nothing  at  all?",  Gesenius.) 
 




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