browse words by letter
a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z

viewmore about view

view


  3  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  View  \View\,  n.  [OF.  veue,  F.  vue,  fr  OF  veoir  to  see  p.  p. 
  veu,  F.  voir,  p.  p.  vu  fr  L.  videre  to  see  See  {Vision}, 
  and  cl  {Interview},  {Purview},  {Review},  {Vista}.] 
  1.  The  act  of  seeing  or  beholding;  sight;  look  survey; 
  examination  by  the  eye;  inspection. 
 
  Thenceforth  I  thought  thee  worth  my  nearer  view. 
  --Milton. 
 
  Objects  near  our  view  are  thought  greater  than  those 
  of  a  larger  size  are  more  remote.  --Locke. 
 
  Surveying  nature  with  too  nice  a  view.  --Dryden. 
 
  2.  Mental  survey;  intellectual  perception  or  examination;  as 
  a  just  view  of  the  arguments  or  facts  in  a  case. 
 
  I  have  with  exact  view  perused  thee,  Hector.  --Shak. 
 
  3.  Power  of  seeing,  either  physically  or  mentally;  reach  or 
  range  of  sight;  extent  of  prospect. 
 
  The  walls  of  Pluto's  palace  are  in  view.  --Dryden. 
 
  4.  That  which  is  seen  or  beheld;  sight  presented  to  the 
  natural  or  intellectual  eye;  scene;  prospect;  as  the  view 
  from  a  window. 
 
  'T  is  distance  lends  enchantment  to  the  view. 
  --Campbell. 
 
  5.  The  pictorial  representation  of  a  scene;  a  sketch,  ?ither 
  drawn  or  painted;  as  a  fine  view  of  Lake  George. 
 
  6.  Mode  of  looking  at  anything  manner  of  apprehension; 
  conception;  opinion;  judgment;  as  to  state  one's  views  of 
  the  policy  which  ought  to  be  pursued. 
 
  To  give  a  right  view  of  this  mistaken  part  of 
  liberty.  --Locke. 
 
  7.  That  which  is  looked  towards,  or  kept  in  sight,  as  object, 
  aim  intention,  purpose,  design;  as  he  did  it  with  a  view 
  of  escaping. 
 
  No  man  sets  himself  about  anything  but  upon  some 
  view  or  other  which  serves  him  for  a  reason. 
  --Locke. 
 
  8.  Appearance;  show  aspect.  [Obs.] 
 
  [Graces]  which  by  the  splendor  of  her  view  Dazzled, 
  before  we  never  knew.  --Waller. 
 
  {Field  of  view}.  See  under  {Field}. 
 
  {Point  of  view}.  See  under  {Point}. 
 
  {To  have  in  view},  to  have  in  mind  as  an  incident,  object,  or 
  aim  as  to  have  one's  resignation  in  view. 
 
  {View  halloo},  the  shout  uttered  by  a  hunter  upon  seeing  the 
  fox  break  cover. 
 
  {View  of  frankpledge}  (Law),  a  court  of  record,  held  in  a 
  hundred,  lordship,  or  manor,  before  the  steward  of  the 
  leet.  --Blackstone. 
 
  {View  of  premises}  (Law),  the  inspection  by  the  jury  of  the 
  place  where  a  litigated  transaction  is  said  to  have 
  occurred. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  View  \View\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Viewed};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Viewing}.] 
  1.  To  see  to  behold;  especially,  to  look  at  with  attention, 
  or  for  the  purpose  of  examining;  to  examine  with  the  eye; 
  to  inspect;  to  explore. 
 
  O,  let  me  view  his  visage,  being  dead.  --Shak. 
 
  Nearer  to  view  his  prey,  and  unespied  To  mark  what 
  of  their  state  he  more  might  learn.  --Milton. 
 
  2.  To  survey  or  examine  mentally;  to  consider;  as  to  view 
  the  subject  in  all  its  aspects. 
 
  The  happiest  youth,  viewing  his  progress  through 
  --Shak. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  view 
  n  1:  a  way  of  regarding  situations  or  topics  etc.;  "consider  what 
  follows  from  the  positivist  view"  [syn:  {position},  {perspective}] 
  2:  the  visual  percept  of  a  region;  "the  most  desirable  feature 
  of  the  park  are  the  beautiful  views"  [syn:  {aspect},  {prospect}, 
  {scene},  {vista},  {panorama}] 
  3:  the  act  of  looking  or  seeing  or  observing;  "he  tried  to  get 
  a  better  view  of  it";  "his  survey  of  the  battlefield  was 
  limited"  [syn:  {survey},  {sight}] 
  4:  the  range  of  the  eye;  "they  were  soon  out  of  view"  [syn:  {eyeshot}] 
  5:  a  personal  belief  that  is  not  founded  on  proof  or  certainty; 
  "my  opinion  differs  from  yours";  "what  are  your  thoughts 
  on  Haiti?"  [syn:  {opinion},  {sentiment},  {persuasion},  {thought}] 
  6:  a  message  expressing  a  belief  about  something  "his  opinions 
  appeared  frequently  on  the  editorial  page"  [syn:  {opinion}] 
  7:  the  phrase  "with  a  view  to"  means  "with  the  intention  of"; 
  "he  took  the  computer  with  a  view  to  pawning  it" 
  8:  the  graphic  or  photographic  representation  of  a  visual 
  percept;  "he  painted  scenes  from  everyday  life";  "figure  2 
  shows  photographic  and  schematic  views  of  the  equipment" 
  [syn:  {scene}] 
  9:  the  range  of  interest  or  activity  that  can  be  anticipated; 
  "It  is  beyond  the  horizon  of  present  knowledge"  [syn:  {horizon}, 
  {purview}] 
  10:  outward  appearance;  "they  look  the  same  in  outward  view" 
  v  1:  consider  or  deem  to  be  regard;  "She  views  this  quite 
  differently  from  me";  "I  consider  her  to  be  shallow" 
  [syn:  {see},  {consider},  {reckon},  {regard}] 
  2:  look  at  carefully;  study  mentally;  "view  a  problem"  [syn:  {consider}, 
  {look  at}] 
  3:  see  or  watch;  "view  a  show  on  television";  "This  program 
  will  be  seen  all  over  the  world";  "view  an  exhibition"; 
  "Catch  a  show  on  Brodaway"  [syn:  {watch},  {see},  {catch}, 
  {take  in}] 




more about view