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dip

more about dip

dip


  9  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Magnetic  \Mag*net"ic\,  Magnetical  \Mag*net"ic*al\,  a.  [L. 
  magneticus:  cf  F.  magn['e]tique.] 
  1.  Pertaining  to  the  magnet;  possessing  the  properties  of  the 
  magnet,  or  corresponding  properties;  as  a  magnetic  bar  of 
  iron;  a  magnetic  needle. 
 
  2.  Of  or  pertaining  to  or  characterized  by  the  earth's 
  magnetism;  as  the  magnetic  north;  the  magnetic  meridian. 
 
  3.  Capable  of  becoming  a  magnet;  susceptible  to  magnetism; 
  as  the  magnetic  metals. 
 
  4.  Endowed  with  extraordinary  personal  power  to  excite  the 
  feelings  and  to  win  the  affections;  attractive;  inducing 
  attachment. 
 
  She  that  had  all  magnetic  force  alone.  --Donne. 
 
  5.  Having  susceptible  to  or  induced  by  animal  magnetism, 
  so  called  as  a  magnetic  sleep.  See  {Magnetism}. 
 
  {Magnetic  amplitude},  {attraction},  {dip},  {induction},  etc 
  See  under  {Amplitude},  {Attraction},  etc 
 
  {Magnetic  battery},  a  combination  of  bar  or  horseshoe  magnets 
  with  the  like  poles  adjacent,  so  as  to  act  together  with 
  great  power. 
 
  {Magnetic  compensator},  a  contrivance  connected  with  a  ship's 
  compass  for  compensating  or  neutralizing  the  effect  of  the 
  iron  of  the  ship  upon  the  needle. 
 
  {Magnetic  curves},  curves  indicating  lines  of  magnetic  force, 
  as  in  the  arrangement  of  iron  filings  between  the  poles  of 
  a  powerful  magnet. 
 
  {Magnetic  elements}. 
  a  (Chem.  Physics)  Those  elements,  as  iron,  nickel, 
  cobalt,  chromium,  manganese,  etc.,  which  are  capable 
  or  becoming  magnetic. 
  b  (Physics)  In  respect  to  terrestrial  magnetism,  the 
  declination,  inclination,  and  intensity. 
  c  See  under  {Element}. 
 
  {Magnetic  equator},  the  line  around  the  equatorial  parts  of 
  the  earth  at  which  there  is  no  dip,  the  dipping  needle 
  being  horizontal. 
 
  {Magnetic  field},  or  {Field  of  magnetic  force},  any  space 
  through  which  magnet  exerts  its  influence. 
 
  {Magnetic  fluid},  the  hypothetical  fluid  whose  existence  was 
  formerly  assumed  in  the  explanations  of  the  phenomena  of 
  magnetism. 
 
  {Magnetic  iron},  or  {Magnetic  iron  ore}.  (Min.)  Same  as 
  {Magnetite}. 
 
  {Magnetic  needle},  a  slender  bar  of  steel,  magnetized  and 
  suspended  at  its  center  on  a  sharp-pointed  pivot,  or  by  a 
  delicate  fiber,  so  that  it  may  take  freely  the  direction 
  of  the  magnetic  meridian.  It  constitutes  the  essential 
  part  of  a  compass,  such  as  the  mariner's  and  the 
  surveyor's. 
 
  {Magnetic  poles},  the  two  points  in  the  opposite  polar 
  regions  of  the  earth  at  which  the  direction  of  the  dipping 
  needle  is  vertical. 
 
  {Magnetic  pyrites}.  See  {Pyrrhotite}. 
 
  {Magnetic  storm}  (Terrestrial  Physics),  a  disturbance  of  the 
  earth's  magnetic  force  characterized  by  great  and  sudden 
  changes. 
 
  {Magnetic  telegraph},  a  telegraph  acting  by  means  of  a 
  magnet.  See  {Telegraph}. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dip  \Dip\,  n. 
  1.  A  gymnastic  exercise  on  the  parallel  bars  in  which  the 
  performer,  resting  on  his  hands,  lets  his  arms  bend  and 
  his  body  sink  until  his  chin  is  level  with  the  bars,  and 
  then  raises  himself  by  straightening  his  arms. 
 
  2.  In  the  turpentine  industry,  the  viscid  exudation,  which  is 
  dipped  out  from  incisions  in  the  trees;  as  virgin  dip 
  (the  runnings  of  the  first  year),  yellow  dip  (the  runnings 
  of  subsequent  years). 
 
  3.  (A["e]ronautics)  A  sudden  drop  followed  by  a  climb, 
  usually  to  avoid  obstacles  or  as  the  result  of  getting 
  into  an  airhole 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dip  \Dip\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Dipped}or  {Dipt}  (?);  p.  pr  & 
  vb  n.  {Dipping}.]  [OE.  dippen,  duppen,  AS  dyppan  akin  to 
  Dan.  dyppe  Sw  doppa,  and  to  AS  d?pan  to  baptize,  OS 
  d?pian,  D.  doopen  G.  taufen,  Sw  d["o]pa,  Goth.  daupjan 
  Lith.  dubus  deep,  hollow,  OSlav.  dupl?  hollow,  and  to  E. 
  dive.  Cf  {Deep},  {Dive}.] 
  1.  To  plunge  or  immerse;  especially,  to  put  for  a  moment  into 
  a  liquid;  to  insert  into  a  fluid  and  withdraw  again 
 
  The  priest  shall  dip  his  finger  in  the  blood.  --Lev. 
  iv  6. 
 
  [Wat'ry  fowl]  now  dip  their  pinions  in  the  briny 
  deep.  --Pope. 
 
  While  the  prime  swallow  dips  his  wing.  --Tennyson. 
 
  2.  To  immerse  for  baptism;  to  baptize  by  immersion.  --Book  of 
  Common  Prayer.  Fuller. 
 
  3.  To  wet,  as  if  by  immersing;  to  moisten.  [Poetic] 
 
  A  cold  shuddering  dew  Dips  me  all  o'er.  --Milton. 
 
  4.  To  plunge  or  engage  thoroughly  in  any  affair. 
 
  He  was  .  .  .  dipt  in  the  rebellion  of  the  Commons. 
  --Dryden. 
 
  5.  To  take  out  by  dipping  a  dipper,  ladle,  or  other 
  receptacle,  into  a  fluid  and  removing  a  part  --  often 
  with  out  as  to  dip  water  from  a  boiler;  to  dip  out 
  water. 
 
  6.  To  engage  as  a  pledge;  to  mortgage.  [Obs.] 
 
  Live  on  the  use  and  never  dip  thy  lands.  --Dryden. 
 
  {Dipped  candle},  a  candle  made  by  repeatedly  dipping  a  wick 
  in  melted  tallow. 
 
  {To  dip  snuff},  to  take  snuff  by  rubbing  it  on  the  gums  and 
  teeth.  [Southern  U.  S.] 
 
  {To  dip  the  colors}  (Naut.),  to  lower  the  colors  and  return 
  them  to  place  --  a  form  of  naval  salute. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dip  \Dip\,  n. 
  1.  The  action  of  dipping  or  plunging  for  a  moment  into  a 
  liquid.  ``The  dip  of  oars  in  unison.''  --Glover. 
 
  2.  Inclination  downward;  direction  below  a  horizontal  line 
  slope;  pitch. 
 
  3.  A  liquid,  as  a  sauce  or  gravy,  served  at  table  with  a 
  ladle  or  spoon.  [Local,  U.S.]  --Bartlett. 
 
  4.  A  dipped  candle.  [Colloq.]  --Marryat. 
 
  {Dip  of  the  horizon}  (Astron.),  the  angular  depression  of  the 
  seen  or  visible  horizon  below  the  true  or  natural  horizon; 
  the  angle  at  the  eye  of  an  observer  between  a  horizontal 
  line  and  a  tangent  drawn  from  the  eye  to  the  surface  of 
  the  ocean. 
 
  {Dip  of  the  needle},  or  {Magnetic  dip},  the  angle  formed,  in 
  a  vertical  plane,  by  a  freely  suspended  magnetic  needle, 
  or  the  line  of  magnetic  force,  with  a  horizontal  line  -- 
  called  also  {inclination}. 
 
  {Dip  of  a  stratum}  (Geol.),  its  greatest  angle  of  inclination 
  to  the  horizon,  or  that  of  a  line  perpendicular  to  its 
  direction  or  strike;  --  called  also  the  {pitch}. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dip  \Dip\,  v.  i. 
  1.  To  immerse  one's  self  to  become  plunged  in  a  liquid;  to 
  sink. 
 
  The  sun's  rim  dips;  the  stars  rush  out  --Coleridge. 
 
  2.  To  perform  the  action  of  plunging  some  receptacle,  as  a 
  dipper,  ladle.  etc.;  into  a  liquid  or  a  soft  substance  and 
  removing  a  part 
 
  Whoever  dips  too  deep  will  find  death  in  the  pot. 
  --L'Estrange. 
 
  3.  To  pierce;  to  penetrate;  --  followed  by  in  or  into 
 
  When  I  dipt  into  the  future.  --Tennyson. 
 
  4.  To  enter  slightly  or  cursorily;  to  engage  one's  self 
  desultorily  or  by  the  way  to  partake  limitedly;  -- 
  followed  by  in  or  into  ``Dipped  into  a  multitude  of 
  books.''  --Macaulay. 
 
  5.  To  incline  downward  from  the  plane  of  the  horizon;  as 
  strata  of  rock  dip. 
 
  6.  To  dip  snuff.  [Southern  U.S.] 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  dip 
  n  1:  a  depression  in  an  otherwise  level  surface;  "there  was  a  dip 
  in  the  road" 
  2:  (physics)  the  angle  that  a  magnetic  needle  makes  with  the 
  plane  of  the  horizon  [syn:  {angle  of  dip},  {magnetic  dip}, 
  {magnetic  inclination},  {inclination}] 
  3:  a  thief  who  steals  from  the  pockets  or  purses  of  others  in 
  public  places  [syn:  {pickpocket},  {cutpurse}] 
  4:  tasty  mixture  or  liquid  into  which  bite-sized  foods  are 
  dipped 
  5:  a  brief  immersion 
  6:  a  brief  swim  in  water  [syn:  {plunge}] 
  v  1:  immerse  into  a  liquid;  "dunk  the  bread  into  the  soup"  [syn: 
  {dunk},  {souse},  {plunge},  {douse}] 
  2:  dip  into  a  liquid  while  eating;  as  of  bread  in  a  soup  or 
  sauce  [syn:  {dunk}] 
  3:  go  down  momentarily;  "Prices  dipped" 
  4:  stain  an  object  by  immersing  it  in  a  liquid 
  5:  switch  a  car's  headlights  from  a  higher  to  a  lower  beam 
  [syn:  {dim}] 
  6:  lower  briefly;  "She  dipped  her  knee" 
  7:  sink;  "The  sun  dipped  below  the  horizon"  [syn:  {sink}] 
  8:  slope  downwards;  "Our  property  dips  towards  the  river" 
  9:  dip  into  a  liquid:  "He  dipped  into  the  pool"  [syn:  {douse}, 
  {duck}] 
  10:  of  candles;  by  dipping  the  wick  into  hot,  liquid  wax 
 
  From  The  Free  On-line  Dictionary  of  Computing  (13  Mar  01)  [foldoc]: 
 
  DIP 
 
  1.  {Dual  In-line  Package}. 
 
  2.  {Document  Image  Processing}. 
 
 
 
  From  V.E.R.A.  --  Virtual  Entity  of  Relevant  Acronyms  13  March  2001  [vera]: 
 
  DIP 
  Dial-up  Internet  Protocol  (Linux) 
 
 
 
  From  V.E.R.A.  --  Virtual  Entity  of  Relevant  Acronyms  13  March  2001  [vera]: 
 
  DIP 
  Dual  In-line  Package  (IC,  DRAM) 
 
 




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