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dry

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dry


  5  definitions  found 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Wine  \Wine\,  n.  [OE.  win,  AS  win,  fr  L.  vinum  (cf.  Icel. 
  v[=i]n;  all  from  the  Latin);  akin  to  Gr  o'i^nos,  ?,  and  E. 
  withy.  Cf  {Vine},  {Vineyard},  {Vinous},  {Withy}.] 
  1.  The  expressed  juice  of  grapes,  esp.  when  fermented;  a 
  beverage  or  liquor  prepared  from  grapes  by  squeezing  out 
  their  juice,  and  (usually)  allowing  it  to  ferment.  ``Red 
  wine  of  Gascoigne.''  --Piers  Plowman. 
 
  Wine  is  a  mocker,  strong  drink  is  raging,  and 
  whosoever  is  deceived  thereby  is  not  wise.  --Prov. 
  xx  1. 
 
  Bacchus,  that  first  from  out  the  purple  grape 
  Crushed  the  sweet  poison  of  misused  wine.  --Milton. 
 
  Note:  Wine  is  essentially  a  dilute  solution  of  ethyl  alcohol, 
  containing  also  certain  small  quantities  of  ethers  and 
  ethereal  salts  which  give  character  and  bouquet. 
  According  to  their  color,  strength,  taste,  etc.,  wines 
  are  called  {red},  {white},  {spirituous},  {dry}, 
  {light},  {still},  etc 
 
  2.  A  liquor  or  beverage  prepared  from  the  juice  of  any  fruit 
  or  plant  by  a  process  similar  to  that  for  grape  wine;  as 
  currant  wine;  gooseberry  wine;  palm  wine. 
 
  3.  The  effect  of  drinking  wine  in  excess;  intoxication. 
 
  Noah  awoke  from  his  wine.  --Gen.  ix  24. 
 
  {Birch  wine},  {Cape  wine},  etc  See  under  {Birch},  {Cape}, 
  etc 
 
  {Spirit  of  wine}.  See  under  {Spirit}. 
 
  {To  have  drunk  wine  of  ape}  or  {wine  ape},  to  be  so  drunk  as 
  to  be  foolish.  [Obs.]  --Chaucer. 
 
  {Wine  acid}.  (Chem.)  See  {Tartaric  acid},  under  {Tartaric}. 
  [Colloq.] 
 
  {Wine  apple}  (Bot.),  a  large  red  apple,  with  firm  flesh  and  a 
  rich,  vinous  flavor. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dry  \Dry\,  a.  [Compar.  {Drier};  superl.  {Driest}.]  [OE.  dru?e, 
  druye,  drie,  AS  dryge  akin  to  LG  dr["o]ge,  D.  droog,  OHG. 
  trucchan  G.  trocken  Icel.  draugr  a  dry  log  Cf  {Drought}, 
  {Drouth},  3d  {Drug}.] 
  1.  Free  from  moisture;  having  little  humidity  or  none;  arid; 
  not  wet  or  moist;  deficient  in  the  natural  or  normal 
  supply  of  moisture,  as  rain  or  fluid  of  any  kind  --  said 
  especially: 
  a  Of  the  weather:  Free  from  rain  or  mist. 
 
  The  weather,  we  agreed,  was  too  dry  for  the 
  season.  --Addison. 
  b  Of  vegetable  matter:  Free  from  juices  or  sap;  not 
  succulent;  not  green;  as  dry  wood  or  hay. 
  c  Of  animals:  Not  giving  milk;  as  the  cow  is  dry. 
  d  Of  persons:  Thirsty;  needing  drink. 
 
  Give  the  dry  fool  drink.  --  Shak 
  e  Of  the  eyes:  Not  shedding  tears. 
 
  Not  a  dry  eye  was  to  be  seen  in  the  assembly.  -- 
  Prescott. 
  f  (Med.)  Of  certain  morbid  conditions,  in  which  there  is 
  entire  or  comparative  absence  of  moisture;  as  dry 
  gangrene;  dry  catarrh. 
 
  2.  Destitute  of  that  which  interests  or  amuses;  barren; 
  unembellished;  jejune;  plain. 
 
  These  epistles  will  become  less  dry,  more 
  susceptible  of  ornament.  --Pope. 
 
  3.  Characterized  by  a  quality  somewhat  severe,  grave,  or 
  hard;  hence  sharp;  keen;  shrewd;  quaint;  as  a  dry  tone 
  or  manner;  dry  wit. 
 
  He  was  rather  a  dry,  shrewd  kind  of  body.  --W. 
  Irving. 
 
  4.  (Fine  Arts)  Exhibiting  a  sharp,  frigid  preciseness  of 
  execution,  or  the  want  of  a  delicate  contour  in  form  and 
  of  easy  transition  in  coloring. 
 
  {Dry  area}  (Arch.),  a  small  open  space  reserved  outside  the 
  foundation  of  a  building  to  guard  it  from  damp. 
 
  {Dry  blow}. 
  a  (Med.)  A  blow  which  inflicts  no  wound,  and  causes  no 
  effusion  of  blood. 
  b  A  quick,  sharp  blow. 
 
  {Dry  bone}  (Min.),  Smithsonite,  or  carbonate  of  zinc;  --  a 
  miner's  term. 
 
  {Dry  castor}  (Zo["o]l.)  a  kind  of  beaver;  --  called  also 
  {parchment  beaver}. 
 
  {Dry  cupping}.  (Med.)  See  under  {Cupping}. 
 
  {Dry  dock}.  See  under  {Dock}. 
 
  {Dry  fat}.  See  {Dry  vat}  (below). 
 
  {Dry  light},  pure  unobstructed  light;  hence  a  clear, 
  impartial  view.  --Bacon. 
 
  The  scientific  man  must  keep  his  feelings  under 
  stern  control,  lest  they  obtrude  into  his 
  researches,  and  color  the  dry  light  in  which  alone 
  science  desires  to  see  its  objects.  --  J.  C. 
  Shairp 
 
  {Dry  masonry}.  See  {Masonry}. 
 
  {Dry  measure},  a  system  of  measures  of  volume  for  dry  or 
  coarse  articles,  by  the  bushel,  peck,  etc 
 
  {Dry  pile}  (Physics),  a  form  of  the  Voltaic  pile,  constructed 
  without  the  use  of  a  liquid,  affording  a  feeble  current, 
  and  chiefly  useful  in  the  construction  of  electroscopes  of 
  great  delicacy;  --  called  also  {Zamboni's  ,  from  the  names 
  of  the  two  earliest  constructors  of  it 
 
  {Dry  pipe}  (Steam  Engine),  a  pipe  which  conducts  dry  steam 
  from  a  boiler. 
 
  {Dry  plate}  (Photog.),  a  glass  plate  having  a  dry  coating 
  sensitive  to  light,  upon  which  photographic  negatives  or 
  pictures  can  be  made  without  moistening. 
 
  {Dry-plate  process},  the  process  of  photographing  with  dry 
  plates. 
 
  {Dry  point}.  (Fine  Arts) 
  a  An  engraving  made  with  the  needle  instead  of  the 
  burin,  in  which  the  work  is  done  nearly  as  in  etching, 
  but  is  finished  without  the  use  acid. 
  b  A  print  from  such  an  engraving,  usually  upon  paper. 
  c  Hence:  The  needle  with  which  such  an  engraving  is 
  made 
 
  {Dry  rent}  (Eng.  Law),  a  rent  reserved  by  deed,  without  a 
  clause  of  distress.  --Bouvier. 
 
  {Dry  rot},  a  decay  of  timber,  reducing  its  fibers  to  the 
  condition  of  a  dry  powdery  dust,  often  accompanied  by  the 
  presence  of  a  peculiar  fungus  ({Merulius  lacrymans}), 
  which  is  sometimes  considered  the  cause  of  the  decay;  but 
  it  is  more  probable  that  the  real  cause  is  the 
  decomposition  of  the  wood  itself  --D.  C.  Eaton.  Called 
  also  {sap  rot},  and  in  the  United  States,  {powder  post}. 
  --Hebert. 
 
  {Dry  stove},  a  hothouse  adapted  to  preserving  the  plants  of 
  arid  climates.  --Brande  &  C. 
 
  {Dry  vat},  a  vat,  basket,  or  other  receptacle  for  dry 
  articles. 
 
  {Dry  wine},  that  in  which  the  saccharine  matter  and 
  fermentation  were  so  exactly  balanced,  that  they  have 
  wholly  neutralized  each  other  and  no  sweetness  is 
  perceptible;  --  opposed  to  {sweet  wine},  in  which  the 
  saccharine  matter  is  in  excess. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dry  \Dry\,  v.  i. 
  1.  To  grow  dry;  to  become  free  from  wetness,  moisture,  or 
  juice;  as  the  road  dries  rapidly. 
 
  2.  To  evaporate  wholly;  to  be  exhaled;  --  said  of  moisture, 
  or  a  liquid;  --  sometimes  with  up  as  the  stream  dries, 
  or  dries  up 
 
  3.  To  shrivel  or  wither;  to  lose  vitality. 
 
  And  his  hand,  which  he  put  forth  against  him  dried 
  up  so  that  he  could  not  pull  it  in  again  to  him 
  --I  Kings 
  xiii.  4. 
 
  From  Webster's  Revised  Unabridged  Dictionary  (1913)  [web1913]: 
 
  Dry  \Dry\,  v.  t.  [imp.  &  p.  p.  {Dried};  p.  pr  &  vb  n. 
  {Drying}.]  [AS.  drygan  cf  drugian  to  grow  dry.  See  {Dry}, 
  a.] 
  To  make  dry;  to  free  from  water,  or  from  moisture  of  any 
  kind  and  by  any  means  to  exsiccate;  as  to  dry  the  eyes;  to 
  dry  one's  tears;  the  wind  dries  the  earth;  to  dry  a  wet 
  cloth;  to  dry  hay. 
 
  {To  dry  up}. 
  a  To  scorch  or  parch  with  thirst;  to  deprive  utterly  of 
  water;  to  consume. 
 
  Their  honorable  men  are  famished,  and  their 
  multitude  dried  up  with  thirst.  --  Is  v.  13. 
 
  The  water  of  the  sea,  which  formerly  covered  it 
  was  in  time  exhaled  and  dried  up  by  the  sun. 
  --Woodward. 
  b  To  make  to  cease,  as  a  stream  of  talk. 
 
  Their  sources  of  revenue  were  dried  up  --  Jowett 
  (Thucyd.  ) 
 
 
  {To  dry,  or  dry  up},  {a  cow},  to  cause  a  cow  to  cease 
  secreting  milk.  --Tylor. 
 
  From  WordNet  r  1.6  [wn]: 
 
  dry 
  adj  1:  free  from  liquid  or  moisture;  lacking  natural  or  normal 
  moisture  or  depleted  of  water;  or  no  longer  wet;  "dry 
  land";  "dry  clothes";  "a  dry  climate";  "dry  splintery 
  boards";  "a  dry  river  bed";  "the  paint  is  dry"  [ant:  {wet}] 
  2:  humorously  sarcastic  or  mocking;  "dry  humor";  "an  ironic 
  remark  often  conveys  an  intended  meaning  obliquely";  "an 
  ironic  novel";  "an  ironical  smile";  "with  a  wry  Scottish 
  wit"  [syn:  {ironic},  {ironical},  {wry}] 
  3:  opposed  to  or  prohibiting  the  production  and  sale  of 
  alcoholic  beverages;  "the  dry  vote  led  by  preachers  and 
  bootleggers";  "a  dry  state"  [ant:  {wet}] 
  4:  not  producing  milk;  "a  dry  cow"  [ant:  {wet}] 
  5:  (of  wines)  not  sweet  because  of  decomposition  of  sugar 
  during  fermentation;  "a  dry  white  burgundy"  [ant:  {sweet}] 
  6:  without  a  mucous  or  watery  discharge;  "a  dry  cough";  "that 
  rare  thing  in  the  wintertime;  a  small  child  with  a  dry 
  nose"  [ant:  {phlegmy}] 
  7:  not  shedding  tears;  "dry  sobs";  "with  dry  eyes" 
  8:  lacking  interest  or  stimulation;  dull  and  lifeless;  "a  dry 
  book";  "a  dry  lecture  filled  with  trivial  details";  "dull 
  and  juiceless  as  only  book  knowledge  can  be  when  it  is 
  unrelated  to...life"-  John  Mason  Brown  [syn:  {juiceless}] 
  9:  used  of  solid  substances  in  contrast  with  liquid  ones;  "dry 
  weight" 
  10:  unproductive  especially  of  the  expected  results;  "a  dry 
  run";  "a  mind  dry  of  new  ideas" 
  11:  having  no  adornment  or  coloration;  "dry  facts";  "rattled  off 
  the  facts  in  a  dry  mechanical  manner" 
  12:  (of  food)  eaten  without  a  spread  or  sauce  or  other  garnish; 
  "dry  toast";  "dry  meat" 
  13:  suffering  from  fluid  deprivation;  "his  mouth  was  dry" 
  14:  having  a  large  proportion  of  strong  liquor;  "a  very  dry 
  martini  is  almost  straight  gin" 
  15:  lacking  warmth  or  emotional  involvement;  "a  dry  greeting"; 
  "a  dry  reading  of  the  lines";  "a  dry  critique" 
  16:  practicing  complete  abstinence  from  alcoholic  beverages; 
  "he's  been  dry  for  ten  years";  "no  thank  you  I  happen  to 
  be  teetotal"  [syn:  {teetotal}] 
  n  :  opposes  intoxicating  beverages  [syn:  {prohibitionist}] 
  v  1:  remove  the  moisture  from  and  make  dry;  "dry  clothes";  "dry 
  hair"  [syn:  {dry  out}]  [ant:  {wet}] 
  2:  become  dry  or  drier;  "The  laundry  dries  in  the  sun"  [syn:  {dry 
  out}] 




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